Claiming carer benefits and financial support

Claiming carer benefits and financial support

Many carers can experience financial difficulty as a result of their caring role. This can be due to a loss of earnings or the extra costs that caring for someone else may involve.

Most carers may be able to claim benefits to help them carry on with their caring role however.

For advice and essential information about what benefits you may be entitled to and help and support to claim them you can visit the Community Advice Hubs in:

You can also visit Carers Trust Solihull for help and advice.

Carer's Allowance

The main benefit that you should be able to claim if you are a carer is Carer's Allowance.

You should be able to claim Carer's Allowance if you:

  • are aged 16 or over
  • care for someone for 35 hours each week or more.
  • you have been in England, Scotland or Wales for at least 2 years in the last 3
  • you normally live in England, Scotland or Wales
  • you are not in full-time education
  • you are not studying for more than 21 hours a week
  • you earn less than £102 a week

Claim for Carer's Allowance

To claim Carer's Allowance now, you can:

Carer's Allowance facts

Carer's Allowance is the main benefit provided by the government for carers. Here are some top facts you should know:

It is currently £61.35 a week.

There is currently a one-off £10 Christmas bonus paid in December.

You cannot earn more than £102 after taxes, care costs and up to 50 per cent of what you pay into your pension have been discounted.

Your savings or National Insurance contributions record will not affect your claim for Carer's Allowance.

Getting Carer's Allowance can help you build up your National Insurance contributions which will help you get the State Pension in the future.

Other benefits

In addition to the Carer's Allowance there are a number of other benefits you may be entitled to. The NHS has a full guide to claiming carers' benefits on the NHS Choices website.

Many carers not only look after someone, but are ill themselves.

Other benefits you may be entitled to include:

  • Personal Independence Payment (PIP) if you also have a long term health condition of disability
  • Attendance Allowance (AA) if you're 65 or over, severely disabled and need help with your own personal care
  • Child Benefit should also be paid if your child is disabled
  • Disability Living Allowance
  • Income Support
  • Income-related Employment and Support Allowance for people under 65 who have a health condition or disability which restricts their ability to work
  • Income-based Jobseeker's Allowance for those looking for work
  • Housing Benefit
  • Universal Credit which is gradually replacing these other benefits:
    • Income-based Jobseeker's Allowance
    • Income-related Employment Support Allowance
    • Income Support
    • Child Tax Credit
    • Working Tax Credit
    • Housing Benefit
  • Pension Credit either through Guarantee Credit or Savings Credit
  • Cold Weather Payment

Help, advice and support for carer benefits

If you are entitled to one of the benefits mentioned above, it will be the one which pays you the most. In some cases, you may be entitled to more than one.

It is also important to understand that benefits you receive to help with your caring role could affect the benefits of the person that you care for.

For help and advice over which benefits you are entitled to you can:

Further advice and information is also available from:

Assessed carers

If you have had an assessment for your support needs and have care and support plans in place for you and the person you care for, you may be entitled to a direct payment for your own needs and those of the person you care for.

Your benefit entitlement will be discussed as part of your support plan with your social worker or a carers support worker from Carers Trust Solihull.

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